The Times

The Times is a British daily national newspaper, first published in London in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times (founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers.

Featured Writers

Russell Hargrave

Writer and freelance reporter. Ten years experience in media and communications. Guardian, ITV News, politics.co.uk, Devex, Public Finance …

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Emma James

Reporting for The Sun |Former News Reporter at Cavendish Press | Former Reporter at Stoke Sentinel | NAPA …

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Skills: Reporter, Blogger
Specialisms: Journalism

Ekta Khanchandani

22 year old journalist - MA Interactive Journalist at City, University of London with a BA Journalism and …

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James Hacker

Hello! I'm a science writer specialising in health and technology.Contact me at jameskristianhacker [at] gmail [dot] com

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Sarah Woodall

Journalist based in metro-Atlanta whose work has been known to stretch beyond the sports realm

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Latest Articles

Cannabis vapes laced with ‘zombie’ drug Spice put children’s lives at risk

Children’s lives are being put at risk by a dangerous new trend for inhaling illegal cannabis vapes, many laced with the “zombie” drug Spice. Pupils have collapsed in schools and been taken to hospital after using the vapes, which can be bought online for just £15. Many are unaware the vaping fluids they have bought also contain toxic chemicals and Spice. Young people are attracted to vaping drugs partly because the e-cigarettes are small, almost odourless and easily hidden.
By Rachel King
The Times

Stefanos Tsitsipas is told off by his mum for meltdown

Tsitsipas lost his temper and accidentally hit his dad with his racket, left, which prompted a telling-off from his mum, right ATP TOUR TV There is something reassuring about the racket-smashing fury of Stefanos Tsitsipas. His achievements, aged 21, are enviable: ATP World Tour finals champion, world No 6, three times a victor over Roger Federer. For all that, the Greek is similar to many people in at least one regard — if he misbehaves, his mum will lay down the law. After losing a tie-break
By Ekta Khanchandani
The Times

Revamped St Matt’s church in Exeter is hell, say regular worshippers

Carpets cover the old stone floor to help acoustics at St Matt’s A church’s plan to attract younger people by changing its name from St Matthew’s to St Matt’s has upset regular worshippers. The move by the church in Exeter was part of a £1.3 million marketing exercise by the Church of England led by Holy Trinity Brompton in west London. It was hoped that a name change, new logo and social media presence would appeal to the 30,000 students in Exeter and lift its congregation from as little as
By Rachael Pells
The Times

Hong Kong bidder Charles Li warns it’s China’s time

A “corporate tale of Romeo and Juliet” is how the boss of Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing described its proposed takeover of London Stock Exchange Group this week, perhaps forgetting how the play ended. Such colourful language is typical of a man, born in Mao Zedong’s China, whose rise to prominence would befit a Shakespearean drama. At 16, Charles Li escaped being “sent down” for farm labour to work on a frosty oil rig in China’s northern Bohai Bay before becoming a journalist, lawyer, banker
By Amy Hawkins
The Times

Women’s World Cup: Early setback has put Japan’s hope of a second bloom in doubt

The Japanese word nadeshiko refers to a pink carnation found in the country’s mountains. It also describes a romanticised idea of Japanese womanhood: silent, still and picture-perfect. Somewhat incongruous, then, that nadeshiko is the nickname of the national football team who, eight years ago, were world champions.
By Harriet Marsden
The Times

Estefanía Banini: The ‘female Messi’ fighting discrimination in Argentina now sets sights on England

To be compared to Lionel Messi, arguably the world’s greatest footballer, is heady praise for most athletes. But Estefanía Banini, the star of Argentina’s national women’s side, prefers a more personal approach.
By Harriet Marsden
The Times

Chelsea’s Erin Cuthbert carries Scottish hopes of World Cup surprise victory over England

Which footballer best embodies the Scottish women’s team? For the coach and former captain, Shelley Kerr, it is Erin Cuthbert. This may surprise some, given the Chelsea midfielder’s relative juniority but Kerr, the first UK woman to manage a senior men’s team, knows something about Scottish spirit.
By Harriet Marsden
The Times

No need to show passports at hi‑tech Heathrow

The shift towards biometric technology should cut time passing through Heathrow by up to a third ALAMY Passengers travelling from Heathrow will be able to check in and board their flight without showing a passport from this summer. A £50 million project to install permanent facial recognition technology at Britain’s biggest airport is intended to reduce time spent passing through by up to a third as travellers will not need to show a boarding pass either. It is the biggest single deployment of
By Daphne Bugler
The Times

Climate pupils plan summer of strikes

Pupils who skipped school to protest about climate change have said they will continue their demonstrations throughout the summer because they are “not about skiving”. Thousands of teenagers have formed networks to co-ordinate campaigns to demand action by politicians on climate change. They have held monthly strikes simultaneously with young people around the world, gathering in Westminster and city centres on Fridays. Some met Greta Thunberg, the Swedish girl aged 16 who started the movement,
By Daphne Bugler
The Times

Inaccurate trackers miss the marathon by miles

Fitness trackers are underestimating distances by such a large margin that some runners in the London Marathon tomorrow would need to cover almost 40 miles before their device told them that they had finished. Analysis by Which? found wide variations when they tested 118 trackers and smartwatches from brands including Apple, Fitbit and Garmin. The Garmin Vivosmart 4 was the least accurate, underestimating running distances by as much as 41.5 per cent. It miscalculated the marathon by 10.8 mile
By Daphne Bugler
The Times

Parents asked to pay for teachers’ salaries and school repairs

Parents are bringing in stationery, glue sticks, exercise books and boxes of tissues for their children. State schools are asking parents to donate hundreds of pounds a year to pay for salaries, buy textbooks and equipment and repair leaking buildings, a Times investigation has revealed. Grammars, comprehensives and primaries are increasingly relying on families to pay for essentials and in one case have asked for up to £1,200 per child each year. Others do not specify amounts but are rec
By Elsa Maishman
The Times

Climate protest pupils are arrested for halting traffic

Three children were arrested and led away in handcuffs yesterday as a school pupils’ climate change protest halted traffic in Westminster. One pupil, dressed in school uniform, was led away with two others after buses and cars were brought to a standstill in the roads around Parliament Square. Thousands of children 60 towns were on strike from lessons for a day. They are campaigning against government inaction on global warming. Police warned the young protesters that they would be arrested if
By Elsa Maishman
The Times