The Independent

The Independent is a British national morning newspaper published in London by Independent Print Limited, owned by Alexander Lebedev since 2010. Nicknamed the Indy, it was launched in 1986 and is one of the youngest UK national daily newspapers.



Featured Writers

Vlad Bourceanu

Vlad Bourceanu

Musician, law graduate, accredited mediator

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xenia taliotis

Editor and writer covering lifestyle, travel, business, finance, health and wellbeing for a range of national and international …

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Madeleine Raine

Madeleine Raine

News journalist and Co-founder and Editor in Chief of Empoword Journalism

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Auburn Scallon

Auburn Scallon

Prague-based. West Seattle-born. Writer. Editor. Proofreader. Specialties include: travel, arts, dance, food, EFL, and international audiences.Lover of the …

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Mohammed Awadh

Photojournalist/Media/Communications Based in Yemen, Sana'a

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Latest Articles

The false economies that will cost you a fortune in 2022

Many self-employed workers breathed a sigh of relief as the government recently announced a month’s grace on this year’s tax return deadline. Yet while taking the extra time may ease the strain on your finances in the short term, it will end up costing you more as interest will be applied to payments from 1 February, at a rate of 2.75 per cent, so it’s still better to pay on time if you can. The thought of anything costing more than it needs to is especially significant right now as money alwa
By Rebecca Goodman
• The Independent

What does 2022 have in store for the property market?

From price rises to stamp duty holidays, soaring demand for larger properties to historic low interest rates and cheap mortgages, 2021 was a whirlwind. The last 18 months have taught us a lot but one of the main takeaways is that nothing can be predicted and unforeseen events, like the pandemic, can spring up and change everything we thought we knew about the world. This is especially true when it comes to the housing market. Prices have risen significantly after an initial total shutdown in 2
By Rebecca Goodman
• The Independent

How to boost your bank balance in 2022

January is traditionally a month of paying off Christmas debts and beginning new resolutions but this year more than ever, it’s a time when a spotlight will be shone on our personal finances. The pandemic has resulted in an economic crisis which we are in the middle of. It has left millions with less money than they usually have, thanks to entire industries cutting back or shutting down. On the other hand, those lucky enough to keep their jobs and work from home have managed to save money. Yet
By Rebecca Goodman
• The Independent

5 tricks to save you a fortune in 2022

This year things have been a little more squeezed than normal. Inflation is way over the Bank of England’s 2 per cent target, pushing up the price of everything we buy. But that doesn’t mean we can’t fight back. Any money saved is a benefit, no matter what your personal situation. It can go towards paying off debts or towards an emergency savings pot for unforeseen events, or towards specific savings, such as a house deposit, holiday or retirement. Here are five everyday tricks to get you star
By Rebecca Goodman
• The Independent

Why the battle to protect the UK’s mutuals matters more than you think

Until recently I’d heard of most of the mainstream mutuals, including the likes of Nationwide, Royal London, LV=, and NFU Mutual, but couldn’t really have told you why they were that different to any other big, glossy financial services brand. After finally getting around to buying income protection from LV earlier in the year, I was invited to take part in the key LV members’ vote on whether to stay as a mutual or be sold to the US private equity firm Bain Capital for £530m. It wasn’t the onl
By Rebecca Goodman
• The Independent

The 17 worst episodes of your favourite TV shows

It feels like we’re treated to new episodes of great television series every week – but even our favourite shows sometimes get it wrong. Remember the episode of Stranger Things when Eleven went AWOL to team up with a gang of runaways? Or the episode of Friends that lazily told the story of Ross and Rachel’s romance entirely through a clip show? These are the episodes we’ve come to hate and, below, we run through the worst (and most polarising) episodes of your favourite shows, including Game of Thrones and Breaking Bad...
By Elizabeth Aubrey
• The Independent

Pornography doesn’t need to be a dirty word

Walking into shot, I pause to exclaim over the delicate beauty of a small china vase, before pushing my hand deep into its recesses. The script dictates I must then struggle and wriggle for 10 minutes to extricate my hand. Ten minutes is an eternity. I try not to watch the clock on the wall. I look out of the window, at the passing commuters, and vaguely wonder if, when they hear the word pornography, they could ever imagine this. I wonder how and why the chap who’s paying for this clip became interested in women getting their hands stuck in vases; all my porny friends have also been asked to make this film. Did his mother get her hand stuck at a time that coincided with his first erection? Does the vase represent a vagina, a throat, a urethra? But sometimes a vase is just a vase.
By Melissa Todd
• The Independent

10 of the Best Hotels in Stockholm

Open, modern and diverse, yet still with an eye to preserving spots like the historic Gamla Stan district, Stockholm combines both old-world European splendour and clean contemporary design. Here, you’ll find a palace and museums cosied up to trendy vegan restaurants committed to sourcing local produce and beautiful minimalist souvenirs that are too good to give away. Here are my top hotel picks in Stockholm...
By Fiona Tapp
• The Independent

The urgent need to make live music spaces safer for women

Sarah, 23, was enjoying her first festival post-lockdown when it happened. She was near the stage in a crowded space, and a man started to dance close to her. She felt uncomfortable. “I asked him to move,” Sarah recalls. “He just ignored me.” She moved away, but he followed her. “Ten minutes or so after this, he put his hand up my skirt and assaulted me. He then disappeared into the crowd.” Sexual assaults like this at gigs and festivals are endemic...
By Elizabeth Aubrey
• The Independent

Black Friday isn’t just bad for your wallet, it’s damaging the climate

Black Friday has become infamous for insanely cheap deals, frantic online check outs and apocalyptic images of customers fighting over TV sets. It’s no surprise that, according to a recent survey by idealo.co.uk, nine out of 10 shoppers find Black Friday highly stressful. The same survey also revealed that 24 per cent of shoppers regret their Black Friday bargains. But the impact of these unwanted purchases goes beyond a tinge of self-loathing when checking your post-Black Friday bank balance.
By Kezia Rice
• The Independent

The art of Radiohead’s Kid A and Amnesiac: ‘We were all in a state of wild madness’

“I don’t think anyone is prepared for fame and all the things that come with it,” says long-term Radiohead collaborator Stanley Donwood. The visual artist should know: he has created all their album covers to date and was there to witness how shell-shocked the group were following the success of their third album, 1997’s OK Computer. “Everyone thinks fame is great but it’s very weird. Psychologically, being famous put them into a really strange place.
By Elizabeth Aubrey
• The Independent

Gregory Porter - The Saturday Interview

I said my whole life my father gave me nothing,” says jazz musician Gregory Porter, “but the very reason I fill the Royal Albert Hall, the very reason I do television shows and all this, is because of a gift from him.” That gift was his voice. A velvety blues-baritone, it melds optimism with grit, hinting at pain without ever letting it dominate. It’s been compared to Lou Rawls, Bill Withers and Teddy Pendergrass – but he got it from his dad.
By Elizabeth Aubrey
• The Independent

Inside the new wave of Kashmir protest music

Reham karain”: this Urdu phrase, translating to “have mercy”, is an overused dialogue in Indian films, usually in scenes when powerless individuals find themselves ensnared in the evil designs of the villain. Similarly, for the native people of Kashmir, one of the most heavily militarised zones in the world and the subject of a dispute between India and Pakistan since 1947, this phrase is an unheard, unheeded plea. It is also the name of a song. Written by the poet Zeeshan Jaipuri and sung by r
By Shaswata Kundu Chaudhuri
• The Independent

Edgar Wright: ‘The idea of there being the good old days in any form is a fallacy’

“I still get anxiety at the start of every working day,” says Edgar Wright, now almost 27 years into his filmmaking career. Outwardly, the director of Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead is confident – gregarious even, both on set and today on video call from a London hotel – but he is hardly immune to nerves. “I get asked by film students if I ever suffer from imposter syndrome,” he explains, “and I say, ‘Yes, every single day.’ I always walk onto set thinking that I’m going to be found out…”
By Elizabeth Aubrey
• The Independent

How to work from home without breaking the bank

You’re doing your job but not in the office, so is it fair for your pay to be cut? Some businesses are proposing pay cuts for home workers but what’s the legal position and how are workers’ finances affected by staying at home? Before March last year, working from home was something to do on rare occasions if you were lucky. But after everything changed when the coronavirus pandemic hit, it’s now become the norm for many. A year ago, shortly after “Eat out to help out” ended, employees were e
By Rebecca Goodman
• The Independent