The Cambridge Student

The Cambridge Student is a free weekly newspaper distributed to the staff and students of the University of Cambridge. It is written and edited entirely by a team of volunteers.

Featured Writers

Adam Clark

Cambridge graduate and freelance journalist - currently writing on football for 7500toHolte, the SBNation Aston Villa blog and ...

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Skills: Editor
Specialisms: News

Charlie Clissitt

Hi, I'm a Yorkshire-born English Literature graduate with a love of travel, music, literature, food and animals. I'm ...

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Jenni Reid

Finalist at University of Cambridge. Editor of Cambridge Theatre Review, previously Deputy News Editor/Events Editor of The Cambridge ...

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Skills: Editor
Specialisms: Travel, News, Film

Ashley Chhibber

Former Editor-in-Chief for The Cambridge Student. Classicist. London & Cambridge.

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Skills: Editor

˗ˏˋMicha Frazer-Carroll

Micha Frazer-Carroll is a London-born writer, and Psychology and Sociology student at the University of Cambridge. Editor in ...

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Skills: Proofreader, Editor
Specialisms: Social Media, Science, Politics, Journalism, Film, Features, Entertainment, Culture

Latest Articles

Review: Improv Actually

Many of those who entered the Playroom last night to catch the Impronauts’ Valentine’s production, Improv Actually, may have done so hesitantly. Improv, seemingly by its very nature, is hit and miss. People struggle with the genre due to its sometimes self-parodying focus around energy, spontaneity and chaos. This is valid – in this production expect people to trip up, draw a blank, and impulsively word vomit without really thinking about the sounds, syllables and ideas that are coming out of th

Review: Right Place Wrong Time

As we draw towards the end of term in a place that often feels steeped in misogyny, if you need somewhere to channel your feminist rage, Right Place Wrong Time is a viable outlet. Following the memory of journalist Claire Hollingworth, who witnessed the outbreak of World War Two but had her credit snatched by male counterpart Robin Hankey, Una McAllister’s original piece bears emotional and sociological depth that you won’t quite believe was crafted by a student. As we watch Hollingworth’s succe

Review: Clybourne Park

First taking to the stage in 2009, the themes of race relations, ‘political correctness’ and gentrification in Bruce Norris’ Clybourne Park seem as relevant as ever in 2016. Cambridge Arts’ Theatre’s current production stylishly serves its audience food for thought, however it seems as if more creativity, thought and character development could have gone into the piece. Opening in a 1950’s middle-class Chicago neighbourhood called Clybourne Park, the play propels us into the lives of a couple,

Review: Lemonade

Widely considered to be one of the most influential artists of the millennium thus far, Beyoncé is no stranger to surprising fans. But Lemonade’s release provided a double blow of shock value - not only was it surprise album, breaking a media silence that lasted almost three years, but it also revealed a more personal, vulnerable Beyoncé, that fans had never been exposed to with such rawness, and so unapologetically. In Lemonade, Beyoncé pulls no punches, she is genre-less, timeless, and doesn’t

On the media fascination with student politics

There’s no doubt that the media are somewhat obsessed with student activism, with Oxford and Cambridge stealing a lot of headlines. The most recent events gaining attention from the press include Jesus College’s decision to remove a Benin bronze of a Cockerel that was looted under colonial occupation, and Pembroke’s choice to change the theme of its potentially disastrous ‘around the world in 80 days’ bop garnering headlines from the Guardian, the Mail, The Telegraph, BBC News, The Times, and Th

Why gender neutral college marriage matters

Last week, news broke that Emmanuel’s Student Union is currently re-writing college marriage guidelines to ensure that they are gender-neutral. This is undoubtedly an overdue victory, but whydid it take so long, and where should we go from here? College marriage systems that specify applicants for college children should be two people “of the opposite sex” (as Emma’s did) are damaging on a structural level. Whilst the idea that college marriages are a bit of fun isn’t entirely false, the mess

Mental health is not just a Week Five issue

It’s Week Five. Most of you will have a host of existing connotations attached to this phrase. Much student speculation, debate, and campaigning has surrounded the notion that the infamous ‘Week Five Blues’ is a damaging, institutionalised euphemism that acknowledges and condones the pervasiveness of mental health problems at Cambridge. The dressing up and playing down of systematically exacerbated symptoms of clinical depression and anxiety is undoubtedly purported by the myth of ‘Week Five’.

The Oscars boycott: Not just a temper tantrum

Next month, Will Smith, Jada Pinkett Smith, Spike Lee, and other black actors and filmmakers will boycott the Oscars in protest of this year’s startling all-white acting nominees list. Among support for a brave act of rebellion that flies in the face of one of the most prestigious institutions in the business, came cries that those involved needed to check their privilege and consider themselves lucky to be in such a fortunate situation as to be making movies in the first place. Interestingly,

Plant based eating: Not just for January

Veganuary may be coming to an end, but this doesn’t mean plant-based eating has to. Even if you don’t want to go all out and become a vegetarian or vegan, you could still decide to eat less meat by making plant-based meals that are filling, protein-packed and super satisfying. Even though I’m not fully vegetarian or vegan, I regularly enjoy eating this way because it's healthier, cheaper and usually much quicker and easier to make - time is often of the essence at Cambridge! It’s also, you know,
By Rhian Williams
The Cambridge Student

Review: Killer Joe

Tracy Letts’ 1993 blood-spattered extravaganza, Killer Joe is a play that knows exactly how to make your heart race and your skin crawl. Upon taking the dark comedy to the screen in 2012, when Letts first approached Matthew McConaughey with the script and an offer to audition for Joe, McConaughey rejected flat out, remarking that he felt ‘dirty’ just from skimming it. In this week’s production at the Corpus Playroom there are definitely moments that make the viewer uncomfortable; but much like i

Review: The Master and Margarita

The Marlowe Society’s Master and Margarita is largely a triumph; an excellent performance combining both dark and comic elements that builds up an enthralling energy, only to plod to a rather anticlimactic halt. Mikhail Bulgakov’s zany and multilayered political novel, completed in 1940 but unpublished until 1967, concerns the struggles of The Master, a playwright suffering under the censorship of the atheistic Soviet Union. His subsequent visit from the Devil instigates a bizarre series of eve
By Charlie Clissitt
The Cambridge Student

Worrying about being a worrier?

We all know that one friend who is the special type of worrier; the type who, even when there is nothing to worry about, is worried about the absence of worry and spends time worrying about the amount of time dedicated to worrying. They have convinced themselves that they haven’t done anything with their lives yet they wrestle with cutting down their CV every time they review it. They are the perfectionist personified.
By Laura Tan
The Cambridge Student

Our biggest ever Election Survey: Cambridge students back Labour

A survey conducted by The Cambridge Student into the voting intentions of Cambridge University students has shown Labour to be the most popular party. However, other polls of Cambridge have suggested a Liberal Democrat hold. Of the 732 responses to the survey, 245 students (33.5%) said they would be voting for the Labour Party candidate Daniel Zeichner at the polls on 7 May. 161 students (22%) said they intend to vote for Julian Huppert, the incumbent Liberal Democrat MP, who was elected as MP
By Eleanor Hayward
The Cambridge Student

Stranger than fiction

My adoration of Disney-esque ‘good-triumphing-over-evil’ endings to films coupled with growing up with two brothers who enjoyed fighting probably makes my love of Marvel seem somewhat inevitable. More surprising, however, are the success stories of recent box office smashes: Avengers Assemble, Thor 2 and the epic Iron Man 3 to name but a few, all of which originate from the fictitious Marvel universe. It would seem that I am not the only fan, as Avengers Assemble and Iron Man 3 became the third
By Laura Tan
The Cambridge Student

Cambridge women’s colleges and trans students: The case for clarification?

Cambridge occupies a relatively unique position as a university that continues to have women’s colleges. However, there remains some ambiguity over the status of transgender and non-binary students in relation to Cambridge’s three women’s colleges, Murray Edwards, Lucy Cavendish, and Newnham. The Cambridge Student recently sent Freedom of Information Requests to Newnham, Murray Edwards, and Lucy Cavendish, requesting clarification on their policy towards trans students, including students who
By Eleanor Hayward
The Cambridge Student

“Grossly unfair”: Chronic disparity in college rents

An investigation by The Cambridge Student comparing rent prices at Undergraduate colleges has revealed consistent and significant disparities in price and range across the University. While the University website advertises the typical college accommodation as ranging from £90 to £120 a week, in reality the price range within Cambridge is significantly wider, and it is clear that there are substantial differences in the amount of rent students can expect to pay depending on the college they att
By Eleanor Hayward
The Cambridge Student

“Lowest drop-out rate” figure challenged by new stats

An investigation by The Cambridge Student has revealed that the nationally comparable figures which Cambridge University use to claim that they have one of the "lowest drop-out rates" in the country do not include many students who intermit and then do not return. Significant variation in intermission across colleges was also revealed, with exceptionally high rates of intermission in colleges for mature undergraduates. The figures indicated that the official Higher Education Statistics Agency (
By Eleanor Hayward
The Cambridge Student

DEBATE: Should we continue to lie to Cambridge's hopefuls?

Applications to Cambridge take place under a veil of wilful ignorance. After all, the argument goes, we don’t want to risk putting applicants off – especially applicants from less advantaged backgrounds, applicants who are already worried they might not fit in. Instead, we wait until students get here to reveal that life isn’t quite so rosy after all.
By Ashley Chhibber
The Cambridge Student

Three albums from 2014 that you probably haven’t heard

This has been a great year for music. There was that St. Vincent album every website was raving about, the new Flying Lotus album and all the other apparently wonderful stuff that I haven’t actually listened to. So instead of talking about how the Taylor Swift album is a feminist fightback against the male-centric media industry (and ignoring the fact that Bikini Kill did it first), here are some of 2014’s less well-known albums. Originating from New Zealand, Kimbra’s debut album Vows was a sou
By Jiameng Gao
The Cambridge Student

Ten reasons to watch Arrow

Meet Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell), an ordinary man doing extraordinary things to save Starling City. It’s about justice, love, morality and being awesome at kicking ass. Read on for ten reasons to watch arguably one of the best action-packed shows currently on TV… Arrow. We love shows where we get to play detective, right? Well, a brilliant part of Arrow is that pieces of Oliver’s past on the ‘hellish island’ are given to us teasingly through flashbacks, so nothing is ever as it seems. New face
By Laura Tan
The Cambridge Student

Review: The Rosie Project

A real feel-good novel, Simsion gives an insight into the way in which somebody with Asperger’s syndrome might see love as something which is both logical and calculable. Through the story of her geeky but lovable protagonist, Don, it soon unravels that love is not so easily defined. The Rosie Project tugs at the heartstrings but also makes you laugh out loud in much the same way that ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’ by Mark Adam, does and the storytelling is just as brillian
By Laura Tan
The Cambridge Student

Winter is coming: This season’s best coats

The pac-a-mac is so much more than just a staple for festival-goers. It’s dead handy for cycling to lectures in the rainy weather or a quick run to Sainsbury’s. Also, it folds up into a neat little parcel that fits in almost any bag. This gem from one of my online favourites, boohoo.com, is spot on (see what I did there?). A duffle coat is an essential for keeping cosyallyearround,whatwithEngland’s weather being a bit, erm, temperamental. Opt for one that’s a little roomy so you have space for
By Laura Tan
The Cambridge Student

My First Smartphone

Up until now I had a Rio II, a great little phone that served me well. I could call, text, take grainy photos that I hardly ever looked at again, I thought I had everything I needed. However, lately, I had been thinking about how maybe, just maybe, a smartphone would make my life easier. Wouldn’t it be great to not have to rely on separate cameras or separate satnavs? Wouldn’t it be great to be able to talk to my phone like in a sci-fi movie and ask it where the nearest Chinese restaurant was? W
By Laura Tan
The Cambridge Student

"Machiavellian" media, Sterling and Euro 2016: Roy Hodgson speaks at the Union

England manager Roy Hodgson appeared at the Cambridge Union on Wednesday evening, where he spoke to students about his life in football and his high hopes for England’s current generation. Addressing the chamber, Hodgson at times cut a self-deprecating figure as he gave a run-down of a managerial career that has spanned 38 years and eight different countries. Skipping over his playing days as “not worth mentioning”, the England boss talked of his early success as a manager in Sweden, success h
By Eleanor Hayward
The Cambridge Student

'Goodbye Oxford. We're with Imperial now.' Cambridge remarries as Imperial beats Oxford AGAIN.

With the publication of the QS World University Rankings, CATHERINE MAGUIRE examines how Cambridge has fared, the data behind the figures, and what these statistics can tell us about the state of higher education in the world today.
By Cath Maguire
The Cambridge Student

2014 Tompkin's Table: look at the people, not the percentages

Just when most of us had finally succeeded in erasing the memory of exam term from our memories with copious amounts of M and Ms and Keeping Up With The Kardashians, we were once again reminded this week of the prevalent sense of academic competition and importance that reigns in Cambridge, with the release of this year’s Tompkins’ Table.
By Cath Maguire
The Cambridge Student