The Guardian

The Guardian, is a British national daily newspaper. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia and web presence.

Featured Writers

Matilda Battersby

Hello, I am an experienced editor, journalist and copywriter.I've spent 10 years working for newspapers, magazines and websites. ...

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Sophie Elmhirst

Sophie Elmhirst is a journalist.

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Giacomo Lee

I'm a journalist and I write on music & visual culture for Long Live Vinyl, VICE, Little White ...

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Georgia Aspinall

Hi, my name is Georgia Aspinall and i'm a freelance journalist from Liverpool. Here is a selection of ...

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Emily Yates

Creative strategy and PR for brand and charity campaigns.

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Manisha Ganguly

A multimedia storyteller with an interest in international politics and news reporting. Experienced in editing and photo/videojournalism, with ...

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Latest Articles

When the US government snatches children, it's biblical to resist the law | Daniel José Camacho

While sitting in an Alabama jail, Martin Luther King Jr began writing a letter about the moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. He invoked the legal maxim originating with St Augustine that an unjust law is no law at all. This week, attorney general Jeff Sessions quoted the bible to justify a cruel policy that is, in fact, not a required law: the forced separation of immigrant families at the border.
By Daniel Camacho
The Guardian

'The martyrs did it': bloody end to Indian copper plant saga

David and Goliath are familiar characters in Tuticorin. The south Indian city, home to one of the country’s oldest Christian communities, has been fighting a giant. Days after 13 protesters were fatally gunned down by police, including a teenage girl, activists won a key victory over one of the world’s largest mining companies. For more than two decades, Sterlite, a subsidiary of the London-listed Vedanta Resources, has been operating a copper smelter on the outskirts of the city. Over the same
By Divya Karthikeyan
The Guardian

Indian copper plant shut down days after deadly protests

A British-owned copper smelting plant in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu that has been blamed for unnaturally high cancer rates in surrounding villages has closed, days after 13 people were killed by police during protests against the facility. The Tamil Nadu chief minister, Edappadi K Palaniswami, has ordered environmental authorities to “seal the unit and close the plant permanently”, after a 22-year campaign by environmentalists and residents against the site, owned by London-based V
By Divya Karthikeyan
The Guardian

The Uncensored Playlist

Journalist Chang Ping remembers his first brush with Chinese press censorship. “In early 1998, I sent a reporter in Beijing to interview rock singer Cui Jian, to talk about the difficulty of revolt. The propaganda department was very unhappy about it and chided me harshly; I was criticised for ‘promoting a capitalist view of the press’.”
By Derek Robertson
The Guardian

Paris to decide fate of 'mega' gold mine in forests of French Guiana

Through the window of the small propeller plane leaving the capital Cayenne, the jungle’s canopy stretches out as far as the eye can see. More than 90% covered by luxuriant rainforest, French Guiana has little in common with mainland France bar the name. Yet this corner of the Amazon forest is awaiting a decision by Emmanuel Macron’s government over the development of a controversial open-pit gold mine that would be the country’s largest. Wedged between Brazil and Suriname and about the siz
By Chloé Farand
The Guardian

From Game of Thrones to The Crown: the woman who turns actors into stars

Earlier this year, the casting director Nina Gold sat at the back of the stalls of the Criterion theatre in the West End and watched a group of students from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland perform their showcase. After three years at drama school, each actor had a couple of three-minute scenes to impress a silent audience of agents and casting directors on their lunch hour. Gold slid down in her seat, as if wanting to remain unseen. Every now and then, she scribbled something next to a name
By Sophie Elmhirst
The Guardian

'Designed for death': the Mumbai housing blocks breeding TB

Samira’s neighbourhood of Govandi-Mankhurd was once on Mumbai’s outskirts – far enough away to plonk fertiliser plants, refineries and a rubbish dump. Today, the area is one of the city’s most populous, poor and underserved suburbs. This is where authorities have resettled, in large housing projects, slum-dwellers from other parts of the city whose shanties were cleared for new roads.
By Vaishnavi Chandrashekhar
The Guardian

Hungarian journalists admit role in forging anti-migrant 'atmosphere of fear'

A leading editor at Hungary’s state television network punched the air in jubilation as he took a phone call on Sunday evening. Shortly afterwards, his subordinates realised what he had been told: Viktor Orbán had secured a resounding victory in the parliamentary election. Orbán and his Fidesz party achieved a third consecutive supermajority in the Hungarian parliament after a campaign primarily fought on an anti-migrant platform. International monitors would later complain about the campaign’s
By Daniel Nolan
The Guardian

Excursions to the supermarket have reflected my joys and trials over the years | Cynthia Banham

When I was of primary school age, nothing made me so happy as accompanying my mother on her weekly shop. I didn’t get to do it often – during school holidays or the occasional late night shopping expedition on a Thursday. There was magic in those aisles of the Franklins in Sydney’s inner west. By being with Mum, having her ear, I could influence the selection, ensure she didn’t forget the tub of Neapolitan ice cream or jar of fish paste (otherwise known as Peck’s). It was a nervous wait, though,
By Cynthia Banham
The Guardian

Row erupts between Parma ham makers and activists over pig welfare

Images of pigs in filthy pens and barren conditions have sparked a row between animal welfare activists and the makers of Italy’s Parma ham. The campaigners have released footage that they claim exposes barren living conditions with no stimulation, and injured animals with abscesses and hernias being left without adequate treatment. Their expose of follows a series of investigations over the last few years...
By Andrew Wasley
The Guardian

Car driver broke girl’s neck during attack on man in Glasgow

A driver who knocked down a group of children, leaving a girl with a broken neck, was targeting a man walking in front of them, police have said. Five children aged 12-14 were standing on a pavement in Castlemilk, Glasgow, at around 3.30pm on Saturday when they were hit by a silver Vauxhall Astra. Police Scotland said the target was a 21-year-old man who was crossing the road in front of the children. The motorist struck him with the car, then drove into the children and reversed back over an
By Emily Brown
The Guardian

Facebook's privacy practices are under investigation, FTC confirms

The US Federal Trade Commission is investigating Facebook’s privacy practices following a week of scandals including whether the company engaged in “unfair acts” which cause “substantial injury” to consumers. Facebook’s stock, which already took a big hit last week, plunged as a result. Facebook’s privacy practices have come under fire after revelations in the Observer that Cambridge Analytica got data on Facebook users, including information on friends of people who had downloaded a psycholog
By Emily Brown
The Guardian

Vote Leave members 'may have committed criminal offences'

A number of possible criminal offences may have been committed by members of the official Brexit campaign during the EU referendum, according to the expert view of some of Britain’s leading barristers. Intensifying the pressure on senior figures within Theresa May’s cabinet and No 10 Downing Street, Helen Mountfield QC and Clare Montgomery QC of Matrix Chambers, concluded there is a “prima facie case” that a number of electoral offences were committed by the Vote Leave campaign. An urgent inve
By Emily Brown
The Guardian

DPD to offer couriers sick pay and abolish fines after driver's death

The courier company DPD is to offer all of its drivers sick and holiday pay and will abolish its controversial £150 daily fines for missing work, as part of wholesale reforms to its gig-working model sparked by the death of a driver it charged for attending a medical appointment to treat his diabetes and who later collapsed. The announcement came six weeks after the Guardian exposed the case of Don Lane, who was delivering parcels for the company on behalf or retailers including Marks & Spencer
By Emily Brown
The Guardian

Police treat killing of elderly woman in Paris as antisemitic attack

French investigators are treating the killing of an 85-year-old Jewish woman in Paris as an antisemitic murder, after it emerged that she had survived France’s most notorious second world war round up of Jews in 1942. Mireille Knoll lived alone and was found dead after a fire broke out in her flat in Paris’s 11th arrondissement on Friday night. An autopsy showed she had been stabbed several times before the fire. Two suspects who were arrested are to appear before judges as judicial sources co
By Emily Brown
The Guardian

Police treat killing of elderly woman in Paris as antisemitic attack

French investigators are treating the killing of an 85-year-old Jewish woman in Paris as an antisemitic murder, after it emerged that she had survived France’s most notorious second world war round up of Jews in 1942. Mireille Knoll lived alone and was found dead after a fire broke out in her flat in Paris’s 11th arrondissement on Friday night. An autopsy showed she had been stabbed several times before the fire. Two suspects who were arrested are to appear before judges as judicial sources co
By Lauren Moore
The Guardian

Facebook's privacy practices are under investigation, FTC confirms

The US Federal Trade Commission is investigating Facebook’s privacy practices following a week of scandals including whether the company engaged in “unfair acts” which cause “substantial injury” to consumers. Facebook’s stock, which already took a big hit last week, plunged as a result. Facebook’s privacy practices have come under fire after revelations in the Observer that Cambridge Analytica got data on Facebook users, including information on friends of people who had downloaded a psycholog
By Lauren Moore
The Guardian

Russia retaliates with vow to expel dozens of western diplomats

Russia has vowed to expel dozens of western diplomats in the growing diplomatic dispute over the Salisbury nerve gas attack. Officials promised a swift and most likely tit-for-tat response after the expulsion of Russian diplomats across Europe and North America on Monday in a show of solidarity from British allies that represents the biggest concerted blow to Russian intelligence networks since the cold war. In an official communique, the Russian foreign ministry issued a “determined protest
By Lauren Moore
The Guardian

Trump's lawyer sends Stormy Daniels cease-and-desist letter over threat claim

Donald Trump’s lawyer Michael Cohen has sent a cease-and-desist letter to Stormy Daniels, the adult film star who spoke out on US TV on Sunday night about her alleged affair with the future president and threats she said she had received. Cohen’s lawyer, Brent Blakely, wrote to Daniels’ attorney to say she had made false and defamatory comments, “namely that he [Cohen] was responsible for an alleged thug who supposedly visited” and threatened Daniels. “In truth, Mr Cohen had absolutely nothing
By Lauren Moore
The Guardian

Why Mark Anthony Conditt – a white Christian – isn't called a terrorist

If a Muslim man planted bombs in predominately white neighborhoods before blowing himself up, you could bet that the White House and various media outlets would label him a terrorist and draw some connection between his religion and his violent acts. But the case of the Austin bomber reveals an enduring double standard: white Christian terrorists continue to get a free pass.
By Daniel Camacho
The Guardian