The Guardian

The Guardian, is a British national daily newspaper. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia and web presence.

Featured Writers

Joseph Alexander Smith

Freelance Multimedia Journalist based in Tbilisi, Georgia

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Lilly Dancyger

Editor of the anthology Burn It Down. Freelance essayist, journalist, and editor. Writing instructor.

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Flávia Milhorance

Freelance journalist Rio de Janeiro, BR

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Skills: Translator, Sub-editor, Reporter, Proofreader, Photographer, Feature Writer, Editor
Specialisms: Science, Politics, News, Lifestyle, Journalism, Health, Features, Environment, Education, Business, Art

Olivia Funnell

I am a freelance writer with a journalism degree and background within television. I have been published in ...

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Jody Allard

I'm a Seattle-based wordsmith with more than 15 years of editorial experience across content types and industries. My ...

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Latest Articles

Why does Coronation Street keep exploding its lesbians?

I grew up watching Coronation Street with my family, breathing in sharply whenever Sophie Webster came on screen. This was 2014, and as the romance between do-gooder Sophie and her runaway love-interest Maddie grew, I’d plan in my head how to say that I was like them. Then, on the night of a mammoth fire, Maddie was hit by a huge explosion from the Builder’s Yard on her way to meet Sophie. Sophie watched on from the other side of the road, screaming Maddie’s name. Maddie died. I didn’t come out
By Molly Miss
The Guardian

The grey wall of China: inside the world's concrete superpower

In the suburbs south of Beijing, what could one day be the world’s busiest airport is rapidly taking shape. Nicknamed “the starfish” due to the striking design by Zaha Hadid Architects, the Beijing Daxing international airport is set to open in October, and could eventually handle more than 100 million passengers a year. While the 52,000-tonne steel exoskeleton covering the airport’s six concourses immediately catches the eye, what lies beneath is familiar to many Chinese mega-projects: concret
By Amy Hawkins
The Guardian

Going it alone: What drives solo endurance athletes?

Few people have the will and the stamina needed to run across a continent or row across an ocean — and even fewer opt to do so alone and unsupported. What makes these endurance athletes different from others who pursue similar challenges as part of a team, or while competing against fellow athletes? Are they simply made of tougher stuff?
By Allison Torres Burtka
The Guardian

Schools staff crisis looms as austerity hits teachers’ pay

Ministers have conceded that teachers’ pay has fallen by thousands of pounds a year since the public spending austerity drive began, amid warnings of a “looming crisis” in attracting and retaining new staff. Classroom pay has fallen by more than £4,000 a year since 2010 in real terms, according to a government assessment. Damian Hinds, the education secretary, warned that only a 2% increase can be expected for the next academic year. The admission comes in the Department for Education’s offici
By Josh Lewis
The Guardian

Racing throws book at Darren Weir but troubling uncertainties remain

When word spread last week that Darren Weir’s stables had been raided by police, it came of little surprise to most inside in the racing industry. Whispers had been circulating for months, years even, about what was happening behind the scenes at Forest Lodge.
By Matt Nicholls
The Guardian

Deportation flights: ministers pandering to far-right, says Lammy

The Labour MP David Lammy has accused the government of “pandering to far-right racism” in its handling of the Windrush row and with its decision to deport about 50 people to Jamaica. In a strong attack on the Home Office, Lammy said its decisions had “killed” at least 11 people who had been wrongly deported back to the Caribbean. These deaths were a “shocking indictment of your government’s pandering to a far-right racism, sham immigration targets and a dog-whistle to the rightwing press,” he
By Josh Lewis
The Guardian

Telegraph apologises and pays damages to Melania Trump

The Daily Telegraph has paid “substantial damages” to Melania Trump and apologised “unreservedly” to the US first lady after making a number of false claims about her life in an article. The claims were made in a story entitled The mystery of Melania, which ran on the cover of last Saturday’s Telegraph magazine, but the newspaper has now said it included a number of errors about Donald Trump’s wife which should not have been published. The piece promised to tell the truth on what it describ
By Josh Lewis
The Guardian

Hundreds feared dead as Brazil dam collapse releases mud tide

Hundreds of people are feared dead after a dam operated by the mining company Vale collapsed in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, releasing a wave of red iron ore waste and causing the worst environmental catastrophe in the country’s recent history. Ten bodies have already been found and more than 300 people remain missing, according to the company. The disaster comes only three years after a similar failure of the Fundão tailings dam near Mariana – co-owned by Vale – which killed 19 people.
By Josh Lewis
The Guardian

Striking design: matchboxes from the eastern bloc – in pictures

Inspired by a book in her local library about matchbox labels from around the world, for the past 10 years Glasgow-based designer Jane McDevitt has been collecting vintage matchboxes. “It was the eastern bloc ones that stood out,” she says, “because they were so contemporary to their time: very mid-century modern and colourful.” She began buying them on eBay and at flea markets, and as her collection grew people started to get in touch with items they had inherited from relatives or found in the
By Bertille Duthoit
The Guardian

Birdwatching like it's 1889: my bird odyssey in Red Dead Redemption 2

The first time I see ravens, I flush them out of an alpine meadow carpeted with wildflowers. I pause to watch the flock fly off towards the distant, snow-capped peaks, trailed by their echoing croaks, when a man riding by on horseback bumps into me. Irritated, I shoot the man dead, and take his hat. So it goes in Red Dead Redemption 2. Available since October, the video game is set in an imagined version of the American west in the year 1899. It’s a huge release, one of the bestselling video g
By Nicholas Lund
The Guardian