The Guardian

The Guardian, is a British national daily newspaper. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia and web presence.

Featured Writers

Tess Vigeland

Bringing fresh, inspiring stories to diverse global audiences

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Skills: Reporter, Feature Writer, Editor, Copywriter, Broadcaster
Specialisms: Travel, News, Lifestyle, Journalism, Features, Environment, Culture, Business

Olivia Funnell

Stories are more important now than they ever have been. Particularly those that are accurate, balanced and hold …

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Jools Stone

Jools Stone is a lively, experienced Brighton-based journalist and copywriter with specialisms in music, arts, travel and lifestyle …

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Skills: Feature Writer, Editor, Copywriter
Specialisms: Travel, Music, Lifestyle, Food, Film, Features, Entertainment, Culture, Business, Art

Alex Jackson

UK-based journalist and digital editor. Writes about science, health and technology, with sporadic moments of music punditry. Contributed …

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Skills: Editor
Specialisms: Technology, Music, Health

Latest Articles

UK government response to coronavirus 'led by science' – Grant Shapps

Grant Shapps, the UK transport secretary, has rejected criticism the government is being too slow to introduce measures limiting the spread of coronavirus, saying ministers are rigorously following scientific advice rather than “doing things that just sound good”. Speaking on a broadcast round, Shapps indicated that further restrictions could be announced following a meeting of the government’s Cobra emergency committee on Monday, perhaps connected to large gatherings. And following a wave of
By Josh Lewis
The Guardian

Coronavirus live news: UK local and mayoral elections postponed to 2021, as WHO calls Europe 'centre of pandemic'

Greek health authorities have announced further preventative measures to curb the spread of coronavirus, saying all bars, restaurants, take-aways and beauty parlours have been ordered closed as the number of confirmed cases in the country rose to 190. Supermarkets, bakeries, pharmacies and other private health stores can remain open. Earlier Friday, the Greek ministry of culture said all archaeological sites and state-run museums would stay shut until at least March 30
By Josh Lewis
The Guardian

Hybrid cars have to be plugged in – and five other common misconceptions

As awareness of the climate crisis grows and urban pollution levels creep ever higher, we’re all starting to think more about our carbon footprints. For those who are considering buying a car, which one to go with requires careful thought and research. Should we stick with petrol or diesel, take the plunge to buy an electric vehicle or maybe opt for a hybrid? Of these options, there tends to be the most confusion around hybrids. There are a lot of myths about these vehicles, many of them based
By Maria McCarthy
The Guardian

'I don't get an extra check for locking you up': a week with an LA parole officer

On a Tuesday morning in October, Los Angeles deputy probation officer Booker Waugh made his way down a nearly sheer hillside, just a few feet from the entrance to the 10 freeway heading east. Waugh, 48, was conducting a field visit to one of his probationers, a man named Joshua Bey. Bey lives in the affluent neighborhood of Cheviot Hills – not in a stately colonial house but in an orange tent, pitched between the freeway and a retaining wall, buffeted by old window blinds and a blanket decorate
By Lauren Lee White
The Guardian

Coercive control and domestic abuse: what might have saved Hannah Clarke and her children?

“I was thinking it wasn’t abuse because he never hit me.” These are words that will stay with Suzanne Clarke. Her daughter, Hannah Clarke, who was burned to death in Brisbane last week with her three children, told her mother that she had questioned herself “for years” about whether she was in a domestic violence situation. With Hannah’s father, Lloyd, and her brother, Nathaniel, the devastated mother told A Current Affair her daughter’s story, of the control and manipulation that preceded her
By Amanda Gearing
The Guardian

Tampon wars: the battle to overthrow the Tampax empire

The Queen of Tampons, one of several nicknames, is a jubilant woman called Melissa Suk. Four years on the throne as the associate brand director of Tampax, Suk holds court at the head office of the multinational consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble (P&G) in Cincinnati, Ohio. From there, she oversees an empire spanning 70 countries, filling bathroom cupboards in cities, towns and villages across the globe.
By Sophie Elmhirst
The Guardian

Jenny Offill: ‘I no longer felt like it wasn’t my fight’

It’s early January and freezing cold in New York when I meet Jenny Offill to talk about her new novel, Weather – an innocuous title for something that feels less innocuous every day. A couple of weeks earlier, the temperature was warm and spring-like. These fluctuations in the weather, and the warming trends they reveal, are increasingly unsettling reminders of the climate crisis, and they form the backbone of Offill’s latest novel, the follow-up to 2014’s bestselling Dept. of Speculation.
By Joanna Scutts
The Guardian

Beyond Byron Bay: a local's guide to the NSW northern rivers' lesser-known towns

When you think of the northern rivers, you probably think of Byron Bay. Yes, the town has surfing, whale watching and even now a Hemsworth among its attractions. But the others towns in the region, even the small ones, have all of Byron’s charm – with less traffic. From spirits (the drinking kind) and spirituality, crystals and candles to wilderness areas, beautiful beaches and one of the country’s favourite museums, there’s something for all, whether you’re day-trippers from Queensland, weeken
By Amy Fallon
The Guardian

'People can't learn about treatments they need': why open access to medical research matters

Campaigners have argued for open access to scientific research since the dawn of the internet – so why is it taking so long? In December 2002, a Belfast teenager made world headlines after his father, Don Simms, won him the legal right to access an experimental drug. Jonathan Simms had been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a cruel and fatal neurodegenerative condition that gives sufferers an average of one year to live. After receiving the drug pentosan polysulfate, Jonathan lived for another 10 years, defying all medical expectations...
By Rachael Pells
The Guardian

Jacqueline Woodson: ‘It’s important to know that whatever moment we’re in, it's not the first time'

Author Jacqueline Woodson lives in a quintessential Brooklyn brownstone with her partner, two children, a cat and two huge, friendly dogs. A similar house is at the centre of her new novel, Red at the Bone, representing the struggle of a multigenerational black family to honour its past and stand firm against change.
By Joanna Scutts
The Guardian

‘It leaves you shaken’: VR show reveals life through an older person’s eyes

“Try walking in my shoes” is the familiar call to the power of shared experience in creating empathy and understanding. Now artist Lindsay Seers has given the principle a 21st-century spin, turning to virtual reality to create a unique insight into how we look after older people.
By Norman Miller
The Guardian

Running marathons could help you live longer – but how do you start?

Running has long been linked with health benefits, from strengthening your bones (yes, even the knees) to improving mental health. Now, in another boon for us smug pavement-pounders, scientists have found it can turn back time. Researchers at University College London and Barts health NHS trust tracked a group of 138 marathoners and, using MRI and ultrasound, calculated the “biological age” of their aortas (the largest artery in the body) before and after their training. As we age, the aorta ca
By Kate Carter
The Guardian

Faster, higher, longer: how female ultra-athletes started to beat men

At the top of a wind-scoured hill outside Edinburgh, Jasmin Paris’s dog, Moss, patiently waits for his owner. He is, I think, wondering what on earth is taking her so long. The answer, I’m afraid, is me. We are in the Pentland Hills near her home – easy terrain for a skilled fell runner. For me, it’s a painful reminder that road marathons and track races do not help in the hills. I spend my clumsy descents looking at my feet, and each time I look up, Paris is defying gravity – not so much dropp
By Kate Carter
The Guardian