The Guardian

The Guardian, is a British national daily newspaper. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia and web presence.

Featured Writers

James Wilson-Taylor

Jamie, comedy & music-nerd for hire. Writer/podcaster @popbuzz plus scribbles for @ministryofsound & one time @guardian. Current stand-up …

View Portfolio

Matilda Battersby

Hello, I am an experienced editor, journalist and copywriter. I've spent 10 years working for newspapers, magazines and …

View Portfolio

Karim Zidan

Karim Zidan is a journalist, author and translator whose writing has been featured at The Guardian, Foreign Policy, …

View Portfolio

Maxim Boon

I'm a writer, critic, editor, digital producer and art director with more than five-years experience specialising in the …

View Portfolio
Skills: Sub-editor, Proofreader, Feature Writer, Editor, Copywriter, Blogger
Specialisms: Music, Lifestyle, Film, Features, Entertainment, Culture, Art

Tara Swan

Ecologist, wildlife photographer and passionate conservationist. Working closely with New Zealand's unique and rare wildlife in captive breeding …

View Portfolio

Latest Articles

‘It leaves you shaken’: VR show reveals life through an older person’s eyes

“Try walking in my shoes” is the familiar call to the power of shared experience in creating empathy and understanding. Now artist Lindsay Seers has given the principle a 21st-century spin, turning to virtual reality to create a unique insight into how we look after older people.
By Norman Miller
The Guardian

Running marathons could help you live longer – but how do you start?

Running has long been linked with health benefits, from strengthening your bones (yes, even the knees) to improving mental health. Now, in another boon for us smug pavement-pounders, scientists have found it can turn back time. Researchers at University College London and Barts health NHS trust tracked a group of 138 marathoners and, using MRI and ultrasound, calculated the “biological age” of their aortas (the largest artery in the body) before and after their training. As we age, the aorta ca
By Kate Carter
The Guardian

Faster, higher, longer: how female ultra-athletes started to beat men

At the top of a wind-scoured hill outside Edinburgh, Jasmin Paris’s dog, Moss, patiently waits for his owner. He is, I think, wondering what on earth is taking her so long. The answer, I’m afraid, is me. We are in the Pentland Hills near her home – easy terrain for a skilled fell runner. For me, it’s a painful reminder that road marathons and track races do not help in the hills. I spend my clumsy descents looking at my feet, and each time I look up, Paris is defying gravity – not so much dropp
By Kate Carter
The Guardian

Greedy Smith: the cheerful embodiment of Mental as Anything's upbeat hits

Late 70s Sydney was alive with music. Utterly unrecognisable from the locked-out landscape of today, venues large and small were scattered throughout the inner city and central business district, up through the northern beaches and out to the beer barns of the suburbs. And, in the wake of punk’s DIY ethos, there were plenty of bands ready to fill the stages. It was into this scene that Mental as Anything, featuring Andrew “Greedy” Smith, who on Monday died of a heart attack, was formed.
By Gabriel Wilder
The Guardian

Prince Andrew: the companies and colleges cutting ties with Duke of York

BT said on Wednesday it would no longer work with iDEA – the Duke of York Inspiring Digital Enterprise Award – while the duke was a patron of the scheme. The prince is reported to either be a patron of, or have an official role at, more than 200 charities, including two dozen that work mainly with children or young people.
By Anugraha Sundaravelu
The Guardian

Ego trip: why are some male runners so threatened by a speedy woman?

At this time of year, many women stop running in the dark. The same quiet roads that are great for training are precisely those that can make you feel vulnerable. Attacks, fortunately, are rare – but intimidation is not. I don’t know a single female runner who hasn’t been heckled or mocked while out pounding the streets. And, yes, always by men. But there is something else you also occasionally see, too: male runners reminding you of their power. Last week, the Team GB marathoner Lily Partridg
By Kate Carter
The Guardian