The Guardian

The Guardian, is a British national daily newspaper. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia and web presence.

Featured Writers

Rod Ardehali

MailOnline journalist covering breaking news, politics and crime.

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Skills: Reporter
Specialisms: News

Christopher Finnigan

Christopher is a freelance journalist and has written for the Independent, Guardian and Slate. He is based in ...

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Matilda Battersby

Hello, I am an experienced editor, journalist and copywriter.I've spent 10 years working for newspapers, magazines and websites. ...

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Rhiannon Starr

Art / Culture / Design

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Specialisms: Culture, Art

Kristen Lepionka

Writer, designer, smartypants.

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Elizabeth Aubrey

Freelance writer, editor and copywriter in the areas of education and culture. For commissions, get in touch on ...

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Skills: Sub-editor, Reporter, Proofreader, Feature Writer, Editor, Copywriter, Blogger
Specialisms: Politics, Music, Journalism, Film, Features, Education, Culture, Art

Latest Articles

The days of rightwing evangelicals swaying politics are numbered | Daniel Jose Camacho

A large majority of white evangelicals voted for Roy Moore – 80%, according to exit polls – in Alabama, in the deep south, in a solidly red state. And they lost. The results of Alabama’s Senate race are an omen for the future of white evangelical politics. White evangelicals, as a whole, are still flexing some political muscle. But their future outlook is of an embattled political bloc with extremist views and diminishing power to decide elections. Moore was a fundamentalist Christian hero. He
By Daniel Camacho
The Guardian

Tāne Mahuta, the New Zealand sacred kauri tree that’ll make you weep

Just a short walk down a wooded gangway into the rainforest of Waipoua, near Dargaville on New Zealand’s north island, is a living giant. Its name is Tāne Mahuta and it’s a kauri tree – one of the largest types (by girth rather than height) in the world. Tāne is named after the Maori forest god and, in the myth, is the fruit of the primordial parents: his growth having broken apart the embrace of Ranginui, the “sky father” and Papatūānuku, the “Earth mother,” allowing the space and light for lif
By Matilda Battersby
The Guardian

Baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky dies aged 55

The Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky has died aged 55. The news was announced on his Facebook page: “On behalf of the Hvorostovsky family, it is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Dmitri Hvorostovsky – beloved operatic baritone, husband, father, son, and friend – at age 55. After a two-and-a-half-year battle with brain cancer, he died peacefully this morning, November 22, surrounded by family near his home in London, UK. May the warmth of his voice and his spirit always be wi
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

Why is spirituality correlated with life satisfaction? | Daniel José Camacho

Spirituality enables people to see more within the world and within others. It’s no surprise that this leads to a greater sense of fulfillment. A new survey from the Public Religion Research Institute has found that higher levels of spirituality are strongly correlated with higher life satisfaction.
By Daniel Camacho
The Guardian

Examination of Chopin’s pickled heart solves riddle of his early death

The great Polish composer and pianist Frédéric Chopin had a morbid fear of premature burial. “The earth is suffocating,” he told one of his sisters as he lay on his death bed in 1849. “Swear to make them cut me open, so that I won’t be buried alive.” An autopsy was duly performed to try to solve the mysterious cause of the 39-year-old’s death. His heart was removed and later stored in a jar of cognac, then interred in a church pillar in Poland.
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

Huge news: scientists solve mystery of dead male woolly mammoths

Scientists have solved the mystery of why the overwhelming majority of mammoth fossils are male. Much like wild elephants today, young male Ice Age mammoths probably roamed alone and more often got themselves into risky situations where they were swept into rivers, fell through ice or into bogs or sinkholes that preserved their bones for thousands of years, scientists say. Females, on the other hand, travelled in a group led by an older matriarch who knew the terrain and steered her counterp
By Amr Ahmed
The Guardian

Universal credit’s hidden cut pushes disabled people into poverty | Frances Ryan

Universal credit is in full-blown crisis, from cross-party criticism of its inbuilt six-week delay to a symbolic government defeat in the Commons over pausing its rollout. But one of the policy’s most shameful parts is barely being noticed: the hidden cut being forced on some of Britain’s most severely disabled people.
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

UK music venues still exclude disabled performers, audience members and staff

Talking to a talented disabled musician recently, I was struck by her struggle to even book a ticket for a concert without rounds of form filling and phone calls to get into a venue with her carer. As the chief executive of the Bristol Music Trust, a charity that delivers access to music, I hear stories like this too often. Too often, the onus is on the disabled community to fight its corner where music is concerned and this simply isn’t good enough.
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

A&E wait times of more than four hours to affect a million more people

A million more patients could face waits of more than four hours in NHS A&E wards in England by 2019-20 in the absence of urgent action to address rising demand, the British Medical Association has said. Analysis by the doctors’ union, shared exclusively with the Guardian, projects that the number of people attending emergency wards and waiting more than four hours to be treated could reach 3.7 million in three years’ time, up from 2.6 million in the year ending September 2017.
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

Unseen Harper Lee letters give intimate view of To Kill a Mockingbird author

A suggestion made by American president Lyndon B Johnson to the actor Gregory Peck that the US would one day have a black, female president is among a number of illustrious anecdotes in letters written by the author Harper Lee that have come to light.
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

I was an eyewitness to the Mogadishu bomb. I’m alive, but heartbroken | Faarah Adan

It was a bright Saturday afternoon in Mogadishu, a clear sky glowing blue above the once beautiful city. The busy K5, or Zoobe Junction, one of Mogadishu’s vital arteries, with its string of shops, hotels and restaurants, was teeming with people from all walks of life. Heavily loaded donkey-carts, rickshaws, cars, buses and trucks all jostled for space through the tightly crammed streets. Across the street, tea women ground their spices at a makeshift tea-stall as a group of elderly men with henna-dyed beards and multi-coloured sarongs were engaged in a deep conversation.
By Faarah Adan
The Guardian

Labour and rebel Tories secure debate on universal credit rollout

Labour and Conservative MPs have secured an emergency debate on the new universal credit welfare system, as ministers face continued calls to reduce the six-week waiting time for claimants to receive their first payment. The three-hour debate was granted by the Speaker, John Bercow, and will take place on Tuesday after a Labour motion calling for the rollout to be paused was passed last week because the Conservatives were whipped to abstain.
By Vlad Bourceanu
The Guardian

Trump's marriage to the religious right reeks of hypocrisy on both sides | Daniel José Camacho

Donald Trump should be the last person to speak on moral values. Yet, on Friday, he received standing ovations for his speech at the Values Voter Summit in which he claimed that his administration is “stopping, cold, attacks on Judeo-Christian values.” This accentuates the moral hypocrisy of the religious right which has wedded itself to arguably the most immoral president in the history of the United States.
By Daniel Camacho
The Guardian

Neon Waltz: Dodging Superfans & Sheep With Britain's Most Northerly Band

Of all the things you might expect to find in Wick, a gently euphoric indie band probably wouldn’t feature high on your list. The town of just over 6,000 sits at the very north-eastern tip of Scotland, three hours from Inverness, seven from Glasgow – “the arse end of nowhere,” as Darren Coghill, drummer for Neon Waltz, jokingly puts it. It’s the sort of place where deer roam freely and castles outnumber supermarkets. Even the band themselves seem faintly bemused by their success.
By Derek Robertson
The Guardian

Finally, Barack Obama is speaking up about Trump's excesses | Daniel José Camacho

Barack Obama finally came for Donald Trump’s White House. In a statement released on Facebook, Obama called Trump’s move to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (Daca) program, which protects 800,000 young migrants from deportation, “cruel” and contrary to “basic decency”. This is the kind of political leadership that our country is sorely lacking right now.
By Daniel Camacho
The Guardian

America's 'news deserts': the death of the great alt-weeklies

In the basement dressing room at G*A*Y Lounge in Baltimore, Scott Murdock – who works by day in a health clinic – is about halfway into becoming his drag alter ego, Shaunda Leer. With Billie Jean playing on an iPhone, Shaunda applies exaggerated fake eyelashes as co-host Abbi Kadabra, wearing a white knit gown, adjusts a Jane Fonda-style wig in the mirror. “It’s really disappointing,” Shaunda says, perfecting a cheek contour. “Not just for us, but for the other fringe artists out there who don’
By Annalies Winny
The Guardian

Britain sends £9m to Libya to fight terror threat and migrant crisis

Boris Johnson has announced a £9m aid package for Libya to help deal with the problems of migrants risking their lives trying to cross the Mediterranean and a growing threat of terrorist groups from the war-stricken country. The foreign secretary announced the extra funding as he made his second trip to Tripoli in just four months, where he visited UK naval officers training the Libyan coastguard in search and rescue. The country has been in crisis since the ousting of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011
By Harriet Hernando
The Guardian

Bringing literature to life: the new GCSE syllabus has reinvigorated my students

Every year, I find myself in the strangest of situations as students filter out of the exam hall. For their entire school careers, teachers have been the ones to impart knowledge, guide them through tricky questions, and set those tricky questions ourselves. But all of a sudden, the students are the experts: experts in the paper they’ve just taken. So we stand at the doors, anxiously awaiting their impressions of the exam, trying to decipher for ourselves whether the paper was “so easy” or was,
By Jo Bullen
The Guardian