The Economist

The Economist online offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science and technology.

Featured Writers

Wendy Muperi

Wendy Muperi is a journalist with seven years’ experience in print and communication. She has extensively covered politics, ...

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Amy Fallon

I am a widely-published and versatile Australian freelance journalist and communications specialist who has worked from five continents ...

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Skills: Reporter, Feature Writer, Copywriter, Blogger
Specialisms: Travel, Social Media, Politics, News, Lifestyle, Journalism, Health, Food, Features, Fashion, Entertainment, Culture

Luke Taylor

Freelance Journalist based in Bogotá, Colombia. Regularly contribute written and radio reports to a number of international publications ...

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chiara eisner

translates research and international news into terms anyone can master. A stickler for good design, she works with ...

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Jack Aldwinckle

Journalist, London

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Skills: Reporter, Feature Writer
Specialisms: Politics, News, Journalism, Business

Latest Articles

Mauricio Macri hopes for a recovery in time for the next presidential election

A as much for its financial crashes as for its juicy steaks and nifty footballers. But even compared with its usual performance, 2018 was a particularly miserable year for the economy. The worst drought in 50 years wrecked the corn and soyabean harvests, knocking 2% off . The peso lost half its value against the dollar, pushing inflation to 46%. That tipped the country into its second recession in three years and led to a crisis that forced it to seek one of the largest credit lines in the ’s hi
By Jack Aldwinckle
The Economist

They used to kidnap tourists. Now Colombia’s ex-rebels run a hotel for them

W was a guerrilla army, among its many illegal sources of income was the kidnapping and ransom of tourists. It started disarming in 2016 but is still making money from tourists in a more peaceful way. In Camp Mariana Páez in Meta province, about eight hours’ drive from Bogotá, Colombia’s capital, visitors can “live like a guerrilla” with 260 demobilised members.
By Luke Taylor
The Economist

Latin American leaders are embarrassed by their aeroplanes

FOR a traveller whose flight had been delayed by five hours, Andrés Manuel López Obrador looked surprisingly cheerful. A video published on social media on September 19th shows Mexico’s president-elect preparing to disembark a budget flight from Huatulco to Mexico City. A reporter asked whether the hold-up, caused by rain, had prompted him to reconsider his campaign promise to sell the presidential plane, a Boeing Dreamliner, which cost $219m and was delivered in 2014. Not at all, replied Mr Lóp
By Jack Aldwinckle
The Economist

The IMF agrees to beef up Argentina’s bail-out

THE three-year, $50bn credit line agreed on with the IMF on June 7th was intended to halt Argentina’s currency crisis. The peso had lost a quarter of its value against the dollar since the start of the year as investors fled to safe havens. It kept sliding. On August 29th Mauricio Macri, Argentina’s president, asked the IMF to bulk up the package. On September 26th, after three weeks of negotiations, the fund’s managing director, Christine Lagarde, agreed to increase Argentina’s credit line from
By Jack Aldwinckle
The Economist

Argentina’s president struggles with a sinking economy

IN 1991 Mauricio Macri, son of a wealthy industrialist, was kidnapped. His captors bundled him into a coffin, drove to a hideout and held him for two weeks before his family paid a $6m ransom. Mr Macri, Argentina’s president since 2015, says the ordeal persuaded him to abandon business and contribute to society by taking up politics. His second career has proved hardly less traumatic. Argentina’s plunging currency led Mr Macri to confess on September 3rd that “these were the worst five months of
By Jack Aldwinckle
The Economist

Why Argentine orthodoxy has worked no better than Turkish iconoclasm

WHEN an emerging market loses favour with its creditors, how should its government respond? The policy prescriptions do not typically include intimidating the central bank, railing against the “interest-rate lobby”, falling out with allies, eschewing the IMF’s help, pouring scorn on the dollar or appointing the president’s son-in-law as finance minister. Turkey has done all of these things, and its currency has duly lost 40% of its value this year. Argentina, by contrast, has stuck much closer
By Jack Aldwinckle
The Economist