The Economist

The Economist online offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science and technology.

Featured Writers

Stefan Simanowitz

Stefan Simanowitz is a London-based freelance journalist writing & broadcasting on politics & culture from around the world. …

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Specialisms: Politics, Culture, Art

Amy Hawkins

Selected writings (mostly about China).

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Sri Muppidi

Sri Muppidi is currently the Marjorie Deane Fellow at The Economist and primarily reports on business, tech and …

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chiara eisner

is an independent investigative reporter and multimedia producer covering technology, science, health, and business for The Marshall Project, …

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Latest Articles

Letters to the editor

You suggest that Britain may be on the brink of a constitutional crisis, and that the country’s “ramshackle, easily amended constitution is vulnerable to the radicalised politics produced by three years rowing about Brexit” (“The next to blow”, June 1st). However, the present crisis is also a consequence of that easily amended constitution. Constitutional tinkering by successive governments, particularly the transfer of powers to the European Union, brought about this situation. Both the Maastr
By Caroline Ognibene
The Economist

Lockdown and the toilet problem

It was a mortifying moment. Crouched in a bush, Katie was confronted by a dog owner whose hound had discovered her al fresco lavatory. The woman remonstrated loudly that (pooch practices notwithstanding), Katie shouldn’t relieve herself in a public place. “It was quite embarrassing and awkward as I was mid-pee, and I just tried to explain it was a desperate situation,” she recalls.
By Amy Hawkins
The Economist

Why Taiwan is not recognised on the international stage

THERE IS an island 180km off the coast of China. Its democratically elected leaders say they run a country called the Republic of China. To the Communist government in Beijing the island is “Taiwan, China” or “Taiwan Province, China”. International organisations, desperate not to offend either side, struggle to name it at all—many opt for the deliberately ambiguous “Chinese Taipei”, after its capital city. To most it is just “Taiwan”,
By Amy Hawkins
The Economist

Left out of the World Cup, America’s footballing deficiencies are laid bare

THE last time America failed to qualify for the football World Cup, the tournament still included West Germany and the Soviet Union. But when the sport’s signature event kicks off in Russia next year, the stars and stripes will be conspicuously absent. In much of the world, there is little shame in missing the event: well-regarded teams such as the Netherlands, Ghana and Chile will also be staying home in 2018. Unlike those countries, however, the United States enjoys the great advantage of belo
By Joachim Steinberg
The Economist

Why is there no promotion and relegation in the United States?

ON NOVEMBER 13th the New York Cosmos won the North American Soccer League (NASL) title, beating the Indy Eleven on penalty kicks in the final. In every other football-playing country in the world, their triumph would have been cause for outright jubilation: the champions of the second division invariably rise up to the top tier the following season, where they benefit both from the challenge of facing the toughest competition and from the windfall profits associated with higher gate, broadcast a
By Joachim Steinberg
The Economist

Scientific research on the coronavirus is being released in a torrent

More than 7,000 papers on the pandemic—covering everything from virology to epidemiology—have been published in the past three months. Much of it is being done differently. There's less peer review and more speed, which is overwhelmingly a good thing. Leaders need quick answers to direct policy and better contain the new virus. But publishers have historically done a bad job at retracting false science, which needs to be watched as it can feed misinformation. A collaboration with reporter Alok Jha, this was the lead note in the science and technology section of the May 9 2020 edition of The Economist and was featured on the cover.
By chiara eisner
The Economist