The Economist

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Thomas Graham

I’m a British journalist and writer. I have lived and reported from across Latin America and the Iberian …

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Skills: Reporter, Feature Writer
Specialisms: Travel, Science, Politics, Film, Features, Culture, Art

Ellen Halliday

I'm a freelance journalist based in Brussels.

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Saqib Rahim

I'm a freelance reporter based in Southeast Asia. Previously, I covered US energy and climate policy at EENews.net. …

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Skills: Reporter
Specialisms: Sports, Culture, Business

Kaitlin Sweeney

policy wonk. communications strategist. campaign professional. this collection is comprised of samples of my written work and earned …

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Specialisms: Art

Takahiro Hasegawa

長谷川高宏| ジャーナリスト。東洋経済記者を経てフリー。英エコノミストに寄稿実績。An independent journalist writing about business, finance and economics from Japan. Freelance work has appeared in The …

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Latest Articles

Explaining the mystery of music

Why You Like It. By Nolan Gasser.Flatiron Books; 720 pages; $32.50. T that “writing about music is like dancing about architecture” has been ascribed to Elvis Costello, Laurie Anderson and Thelonious Monk, among others. Undaunted, in “Why You Like It” Nolan Gasser attempts to explain the ineffable ways music produces sensations in listeners’ brains: its power to move people to tears, evoke awe and induce involuntary toe-tapping. Plus the odd proclivity of sad songs to seem uplifting. Mr Gasser
By Stephen Phillips
The Economist

Explaining the mystery of music

Why You Like It. By Nolan Gasser.Flatiron Books; 720 pages; $32.50. The adage that “writing about music is like dancing about architecture” has been ascribed to Elvis Costello, Laurie Anderson and Thelonious Monk, among others. Undaunted, in “Why You Like It” Nolan Gasser attempts to explain the ineffable ways music produces sensations in listeners’ brains: its power to move people to tears, evoke awe and induce involuntary toe-tapping. Plus the odd proclivity of sad songs to seem uplifting.
By Stephen Phillips
The Economist

Quakers ponder the ultimate religious question

David Boulton, a broadcaster and author, is among those who think there is no transcendent God and is even “a bit queasy about the word spiritual”, preferring to call himself a humanist. But he feels comfortable as a Quaker. By contrast Nat Case, a cartographer and non-theist Quaker from Minneapolis, is more open to talk of the supernatural, though he rejects the idea of an external God. He compares his relationship with religion to his appreciation of “Star Wars”: “You don’t need to know the lines from all the movies…It’s about how it grabs you.” [with Bruce Clark]
By Fred Harter
The Economist

Why Iran is a hub for sex-reassignment surgery

“I realised quite early on that I was gay,” says Soly, a 25-year-old chef from Tehran. As a young boy, he would strut about the house in his mother’s high heels and developed crushes on male cartoon characters. But after he was expelled from school for wearing eye-liner, his parents took him to a psychologist who offered a different explanation. “He told me I was transgender and had to change my sex.”
By Fred Harter
The Economist

What are the school climate strikes?

Greta Thunberg is an unlikely figurehead. In August the then 15-year-old high-school student walked out of her classroom and took up position outside Sweden’s parliament with a hand-painted sign that read “skolstrejk för klimatet” (school strike for climate change). Sitting alone on the cobblestones, she provoked puzzled looks from passers-by. Seven months later Ms Thunberg finds herself at the helm of a global movement.
By Fred Harter
The Economist