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Jenni Reid

I'm a freelance writer, editor and digital content producer currently based in Southeast Asia. I was previously the …

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New York journalist writing about good movies, great powers, small islands and the vasty deep. Among other things. …

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With roots in the wine industry, I now cover finance, farming and agribusiness. Also keen on development economics, …

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Latest Articles

Politically correct cross-dressing in China

T time Wang Zhi performed in drag, 17 years ago, it was in a seedy gay bar three hours’ drive from his university dorm. Today Mr Wang (pictured) says he can make a tidy 2m yuan ($290,000) a year from his cross-dressing routines. Remarkably, they have the Communist Party’s blessing. He regularly appears on nationally televised variety shows. Officials often invite him to entertain people in poor areas. In Xinjiang and Tibet, he boasts, he has enraptured his ethnic-minority audiences. Mr Wang’s s
By Eduardo Baptista
The Economist

Explaining the mystery of music

Why You Like It. By Nolan Gasser.Flatiron Books; 720 pages; $32.50. T that “writing about music is like dancing about architecture” has been ascribed to Elvis Costello, Laurie Anderson and Thelonious Monk, among others. Undaunted, in “Why You Like It” Nolan Gasser attempts to explain the ineffable ways music produces sensations in listeners’ brains: its power to move people to tears, evoke awe and induce involuntary toe-tapping. Plus the odd proclivity of sad songs to seem uplifting. Mr Gasser
By Stephen Phillips
The Economist

Explaining the mystery of music

Why You Like It. By Nolan Gasser.Flatiron Books; 720 pages; $32.50. The adage that “writing about music is like dancing about architecture” has been ascribed to Elvis Costello, Laurie Anderson and Thelonious Monk, among others. Undaunted, in “Why You Like It” Nolan Gasser attempts to explain the ineffable ways music produces sensations in listeners’ brains: its power to move people to tears, evoke awe and induce involuntary toe-tapping. Plus the odd proclivity of sad songs to seem uplifting.
By Stephen Phillips
The Economist

Quakers ponder the ultimate religious question

David Boulton, a broadcaster and author, is among those who think there is no transcendent God and is even “a bit queasy about the word spiritual”, preferring to call himself a humanist. But he feels comfortable as a Quaker. By contrast Nat Case, a cartographer and non-theist Quaker from Minneapolis, is more open to talk of the supernatural, though he rejects the idea of an external God. He compares his relationship with religion to his appreciation of “Star Wars”: “You don’t need to know the lines from all the movies…It’s about how it grabs you.” [with Bruce Clark]
By Fred Harter
The Economist